"Every year, I try to do at least two things with my students at least once. First, I make a point of addressing them as “philosophers” – a bit cheesy, but hopefully it encourages active learning.

Secondly, I say something like this: “I’m sure you’ve heard the expression ‘everyone is entitled to their opinion.’ Perhaps you’ve even said it yourself, maybe to head off an argument or bring one to a close. Well, as soon as you walk into this room, it’s no longer true. You are not entitled to your opinion. You are only entitled to what you can argue for.”

A bit harsh? Perhaps, but philosophy teachers owe it to our students to teach them how to construct and defend an argument – and to recognize when a belief has become indefensible.

The problem with “I’m entitled to my opinion” is that, all too often, it’s used to shelter beliefs that should have been abandoned. It becomes shorthand for “I can say or think whatever I like” – and by extension, continuing to argue is somehow disrespectful. And this attitude feeds, I suggest, into the false equivalence between experts and non-experts that is an increasingly pernicious feature of our public discourse."

No, you’re not entitled to your opinion (via kiransingh)

(Source: pbnpineapples, via phonebookpillow)

tammymercure:

First, let me apologize for preaching to the choir. Everyone I know on Tumblr has been super cool and one of the reasons I love Tumblr is there is a lot of built-in equity.

Selektor Magazine just posted the first 100 photographers that they have featured. It really…

equimby:

select images from The Suitcase Archive, part of ongoing PhD work by Irish artist Martina Cleary, photography tutor and art history lecturer at the Burren College of Art.

loveistheessenceoflife:

ctron164:

cubbyzissou:

Gonna reblog this every Tuesday.

Lmao

Ilana is everything

(Source: hurwitzs, via dannielle)

On 9.20.2014 I got to marry my best friend. The day was perfect. We were surrounded by so much love and support that I am still bursting at the seams with it. But what’s even more amazing is that I get to spend the rest of my life with the most beautiful, thoughtful, talented, kind-hearted, adorably clumsy, selfless, sweet, smart, hilarious, and phenomenal woman that has ever existed and I fall more in love with her every day. Here’s to all the adventures that lay ahead my darling girl.

On 9.20.2014 I got to marry my best friend. The day was perfect. We were surrounded by so much love and support that I am still bursting at the seams with it. But what’s even more amazing is that I get to spend the rest of my life with the most beautiful, thoughtful, talented, kind-hearted, adorably clumsy, selfless, sweet, smart, hilarious, and phenomenal woman that has ever existed and I fall more in love with her every day. Here’s to all the adventures that lay ahead my darling girl.

"These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize."

Why it’s so hard for men to see misogyny (via ethiopienne)

BOOOM.  Read this if you are a dude, please.

(via geekyjessica)

Yesssssss.

(via quothtehblackbirdnevermoar)

Its hard for men to understand why women dont get loud & angry because they havent spent their entire lives being reprimanded whenever they take up too much space. (via pluralfloral)

(via lwessel)

raideo:

spookyelric:

sphynx-prince:

yungcoochie:

bankston:

goodreasonnews:

amazingatheist:

I’m so glad to see the younger generation waking up to this hypocrisy. 

The homeowner at 22 one is killing me.

…………………….

This meme makes me so angry because it’s so on-target.

I am screaming

this isn’t even funny to me it just makes me want to find the nearest baby boomer and deck them in the mouth

I reblog this every time because it always re-ignites my anger.

I feel you sphynx-prince.  

(Source: seriouslyamerica, via phonebookpillow)

petitsirena:

sticks and stones may break my bones, but language dictates everything from social norms to legislation and it’s indeed often used to bolster violence and oppression sooOo

(via phonebookpillow)

"I am not Mike Brown. I am white. I am middle class. I am female. I am small. I am not considered a threat. When police see me they see someone who looks like them. They see their mothers, their daughters, their sisters, themselves. I am not at risk of being shot by police for existing while black. I am not at risk of being shot while unarmed. I am not at risk of being shot while armed with nothing more than a BB gun. I am not at risk of being shot for reaching for my wallet. I am privileged.
But I am outraged. And if you aren’t outraged, then you aren’t paying attention. This is America in 2014. This is our reality. It’s so easy to get jaded and to ignore these atrocities, to act like this doesn’t affect us. It’s so easy to get apathetic. In the past it was the youth who protested. Where is the rage of the youth? Where is our rage?
Like I said, I am not Mike Brown. But I am outraged."

: I am not Mike Brown.  (via fitle-tight)

(Source: sailorspacecase, via phonebookpillow)